Learn more about: ‘A Policy Surveillance Study of State Tribal Consultation Laws’

Lorinda Riley

Project Title: A Policy Surveillance Study of State Tribal Consultation Laws

Lorinda Riley

Lorinda Riley is an Assistant Professor of Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Health at the University of Hawaiʻi Mānoa. Her research focuses on the impact of the Western criminal justice system on Indingeous people and the incorporation of Indigenous restorative justice to improve Indigenous wellbeing. Her current projects include a policy surveillance study of tribal consultation laws and a qualitative study on how Native Hawaiian youth experience historical trauma. Dr. Riley teaches courses in Indigenous Applied Methods, Health Ethics, Law, and Politics, and Indigenous Governance.

Dr. Riley holds an S.J.D. in Indigneous Peoples Law and Policy from the University of Arizona where her dissertation focused on the federal government’s use of politics in implementing the federal recognition regulations, which determine whether an Indian community is an Indian nation with powers of self-dermination. She received a J.D. and M.A. in American Indian Studies from the University of Arizona and a B.A. in Anthropology with a minor in American Indian Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Ian Tapu

Project Collaborator: Ian Tapu, Independent Researcher

Ian Tapu was born and raised in Hauula, Hawaii and is grateful to have been brought up in a tight-knit community filled with family and friends who are like family. He is a proud graduate of Kahuku High School and later went on to receive his degree from Dartmouth College, majoring in Native American Studies and minoring in Public Policy and Education. Following college, Tapu worked for almost 10 years in the non-profit sector. His work primarily entailed supporting Pasifika youth and their families. Tapu then attended the University of Hawaii William S. Richardson School of Law and graduated with his law degree in 2020. He published extensively on topics ranging from LGBTQ rights, constitutional law, and Indigenous rights.

About the APSA Advancing Research Grants for Indigenous Politics Recipients

The APSA Diversity and Inclusion Advancing Research Grants provide support for the advancement of scholars from historically racial and ethnic underrepresented groups and for research that examines political science phenomena affecting historically underserved communities and underrepresented groups and communities. In December 2021, APSA also awarded eight projects for the APSA Diversity and Inclusion Advancing Research Grants for Indigenous Politics for a combined amount of $20,000. Read about the funded projects.