Politics, Groups, and Identities and New Pathways to Rep Publishing in Political Science

Politics, Groups, and Identities and New Pathways to Rep Publishing in Political Science

by Nadia E. Brown, Purdue University, Valeria Sinclair-ChapmanPurdue University, and Kristen SmolePurdue University

Journals are mirrors to a discipline. One of their important functions is reflecting how a discipline perceives itself. Editors are both gateways and gatekeepers. They not only evaluate what is fit to print but also which topics are to be addressed in the annals of disciplinary scholarship. The theories, data, and findings of a discipline are displayed in the pages of journals. Politics, Groups, and Identities (PGI)—not unlike its peers Journal of Race, Ethnicity and Politics, National Political Science Review, and Politics & Gender—performs an important function in the discipline, which fundamentally alters that reflection. These subfield-specific journals emerged in response to scholarly demand for more visible and accessible scholarship, making the discipline of political science more inclusive of a range of research topics, scholars, and methodologies.