Meet 2019 Carnegie Fellow Sharece Thrower, Vanderbilt University

The Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program recognizes an exceptional group of both established and emerging scholars, journalists, and authors with the goal of strengthening U.S. democracy, driving technological and cultural creativity, exploring global connections and global ruptures, and improving both natural and human environments. 

How will the Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program impact your research and overall career?

The Andrew Carnegie Fellows Program will provide me with the resources to commence my second book project on the reciprocal relationship between the executive and judicial branches of government. This fellowship will afford me the time and research assistance to collect several new datasets for this book, as well as the opportunity to host a conference uniting prominent scholars and public commentators studying these topics.

(…)Develop positive and productive relationships with your faculty mentors and peers, at every stage of your career. There is always something that you can learn from someone else (…).

What research topics do you primarily focus on? How can people access your work?

I study American political institutions and separation of powers politics, with a focus on executive policymaking in both federal and state contexts. More specifically, I examine the ways in which the legislature and judiciary can shape the use of executive branch actions, such as executive orders, signing statements, and regulations. Currently, I am finishing a book manuscript (with Alex Bolton, Emory University) centered on how legislative capacity influences the degree to which executive power is constrained. My work is published or forthcoming in political science journals such as the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Legislative Studies Quarterly, and Presidential Studies Quarterly. Further details on my publications and ongoing research can be found on my website.

Do you have any advice for students in political science, including tips on how to find funding and support for research projects?

One piece of advice I would offer to students is to develop positive and productive relationships with your faculty mentors and peers, at every stage of your career. There is always something that you can learn from someone else and fostering these relationships may open doors for other opportunities in research and funding.