It’s a Bit Inappropriate: UK Students’ Negative Perceptions of Using Humor in Teaching Politics

It’s a Bit Inappropriate: UK Students’ Negative Perceptions of Using Humor in Teaching Politics 

By Alexander P. Martin, Mediterranean Institute of Technology, South Mediterranean University, Tunis, Tunisia

The benefits of using humor in teaching have been well-documented in pedagogy literature across various academic disciplines. In addition, political commentary has a long history of applying comedy techniques, such as mockery and satire, to provide more critical analysis. This suggests that humor can also be an effective tool for teaching politics. Furthermore, as political comedy is an internationally popular comedy sub-genre, the use of humor in teaching politics at university level could equally appeal to international students.

Although existing educational literature supports the social and pedagogical potential of using humor in teaching, the research also consistently highlights the risks of this didactic approach, especially when poorly executed.

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The Journal of Political Science Education is an intellectually rigorous, path-breaking, agenda-setting journal that publishes the highest quality scholarship on teaching and pedagogical issues in political science. The journal aims to represent the full range of questions, issues and approaches regarding political science education, including teaching-related issues, methods and techniques, learning/teaching activities and devices, educational assessment in political science, graduate education, and curriculum development.

 

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