Ideology and Religion in Students’ Attitudes Toward Economically and Socially Conservative Professors

Ideology and Religion in Students’ Attitudes Toward Economically and Socially Conservative Professors

By Jason Giersch, University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Scott Liebertz, University of South Alabama

One dilemma faced by political science instructors – and teachers of other disciplines – is whether to reveal their political opinions to students. There may be pedagogical reasons for doing so, such as providing opportunities for civil discourse in preparation for civic engagement (Kelly, 1986). But in a culture of deep political divisions in which professors may worry about accusations of indoctrination or being a target of cancel culture, or just a chilling effect that expressions of partisanship might have on classroom discussion.

While these decisions may be based on guidance from mentors and role models, university administrators, and colleagues, one constituency whose perception of the ideological professor should be considered is that of students. Professors receive feedback from students all the time, whether through class discussions, emails, or course evaluations, but they are nearly always anecdotal in nature.

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The Journal of Political Science Education is an intellectually rigorous, path-breaking, agenda-setting journal that publishes the highest quality scholarship on teaching and pedagogical issues in political science. The journal aims to represent the full range of questions, issues and approaches regarding political science education, including teaching-related issues, methods and techniques, learning/teaching activities and devices, educational assessment in political science, graduate education, and curriculum development.

 

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