The Turn Away from Government and the Need to Revive the Civic Purpose of Higher Education

The Turn Away from Government and the Need to Revive the Civic Purpose of Higher Education

Kathy Cramer, director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service and professor of political science, is pictured in her office at the Red Gym (Armory and Gymnasium) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 1, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)Katherine J. Cramer, Director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service and Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin—Madison

Abstract: Higher education in the United States has proud roots in the mission to enable people to engage in self-governance. The current political context is pushing us in another direction. I discuss the context in Wisconsin in particular, and use the challenges there as a reason to consider the civic purposes of political science. Rather than allow the political winds to blow us further into elitism, I argue that we should renew our commitment to educating people for citizenship.

Read More.

Perspectives on Politics / Volume 14 / Issue 02 / June 2016, pp 324-350 / Copyright © American Political Science Association 2016

1 Comment

  1. Great topic and great argument! I’m an advocate of durable education, one that teaches how to be a social individual. From elementary through higher ed. the focus seems to be on material that is gradable instead of content that can be retained as a life lesson. The latter, I believe, contributes to one’s degree of citizenship, among other valuable social traits. Continuous decisions to change curricula and learning standards are made with haste without measured and tactfuful reasons, which unfortunately only adds up to invaluable (undesirable) teaching outcomes across all levels of education. To educate people for citizenship adequate knowledge must be acquired about them (teachers, students, parents) in order to discussion effective measures for change in the way we educate them.

Comments are closed.