It’s the End of the World and They Know It: How Dystopian Fiction Shapes Political Attitudes

It’s the End of the World and They Know It: How Dystopian Fiction Shapes Political Attitudes

by Calvert W. Jones, University of Maryland, College Park and Celia Paris, University of Toronto

Given that the fictional narratives found in novels, movies, and television shows enjoy wide public consumption, memorably convey information, minimize counter-arguing, and often emphasize politically-relevant themes, we argue that greater scholarly attention must be paid to theorizing and measuring how fiction affects political attitudes. We argue for a genre-based approach for studying fiction effects, and apply it to the popular dystopian genre. Results across three experiments are striking: we find consistent evidence that dystopian narratives enhance the willingness to justify radical—especially violent—forms of political action. Yet we find no evidence for the conventional wisdom that they reduce political trust and efficacy, illustrating that fiction’s effects may not be what they seem and underscoring the need for political scientists to take fiction seriously.

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Perspectives on Politics, Volume 16Issue 4, December 201, pp. 969-989

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