Journals

The Two Cultures of Democratic Theory: Responsiveness, Democratic Quality, and the Empirical-Normative Divide

The Two Cultures of Democratic Theory: Responsiveness, Democratic Quality, and the Empirical-Normative Divide Andrew Sabl Empirical political scientists and normative political theorists both seek to assess the quality of democracy. But they apply to this […]

Journals

Political Science and the Public Sphere Today

Political Science and the Public Sphere Today Rogers M. Smith The potential of political science to contribute to debates over public issues has long been hindered by tensions in the discipline’s goals of achieving scientific […]

Journals

Compared to What? Judicial Review and Other Veto Points in Contemporary Democratic Theory

Compared to What? Judicial Review and Other Veto Points in Contemporary Democratic Theory David Watkins and Scott Lemieux Many democratic and jurisprudential theorists have too often uncritically accepted Alexander Bickel’s notion of “the countermajoritarian difficulty” […]

Journals

Developmental Perspectives on Lesbian and Gay Politics: Fragmented Citizenship in a Fragmented State

Developmental Perspectives on Lesbian and Gay Politics: Fragmented Citizenship in a Fragmented State Stephen M. Engel Responding to recent criticism that American political development (APD) has yet to fully engage with both contemporary and historical […]

Journals

Perspectives Reflection Symposium: Technique Trumps Relevance

Technique Trumps Relevance: The Professionalization of Political Science and the Marginalization of Security Studies Michael Desch explains the disconnect between the discipline’s self-image as balancing rigor with relevance with the reality of how political scientists […]

Perspective on Politics
DA-RT

June Issue of Perspectives on Politics

For a More Public Political Science The new issue of Perspectives on Politics features a special introductory essay by editor Jeffrey C. Isaac, “For a More Public Political Science.” Isaac criticizes what he calls “neopositivism” […]